Photo: GeoBee Finals
Alex Trebek asks the finalists questions during the 2008 Bee.

Photograph by National Geographic Studio

What's the best way for students to prepare for the Bee? Here are some tips from the National Geographic Bee Official Study Guide:

Getting Geographic Activities: Teachers can use these activities in the classroom to prepare students for the bee!

• Investigating the School Neighborhood
Exploring Landscapes Beneath the Oceans
Reading Highway Maps
Creating a State Postcard
Constructing/Interpreting Climate Graphs
Geography in the News
Investigating Big Cats at Risk
Comparing Density and Distribution
Constructing 3-Dimensional Maps
Understanding Time Zones
Constructing and Interpreting Population Pyramids
Tracing Migration Routes
Locating Highest U.S. Elevations
Interpreting “Earth at Night” Images
Mapping Global Urbanization
Tracking Violent Storms
Exploring Diffusion in Your Community

• Get the Necessary Tools: A good, up-to-date world map, atlas, and geography reference book are your best study tools, along with blank outline maps with which to practice locating places.

• Learn Map Terminology: Understanding what you're looking at and correctly reading labels and coordinates on a map are essential.

• Understand the Interconnectedness of Geography: Subdivisions of geography, such as physical features, climate, and culture, are all influenced by each other. Once you understand this, it will be easier to categorize and remember information about countries and regions.

• Follow Current Events: News items regarding political upheavals, international agreements, and discoveries are fair game for Bee questions, so make sure you are an informed citizen of the world. See our National Geographic News site for recent stories.

• Analyze the Questions: Visit our Sample Questions page to see the types of questions asked in the Bee and to learn how you can look for clues within the questions to help you figure out the right answers.

• Keep Geography Fun: There are many games you can play to help study for the Bee. Check out the GeoBee Challenge, with ten new questions each day, and GeoSpy, to test your map skills.

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For Teachers and Parents

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    On March 30, 2012 about 100 fourth to eighth graders in each of the 50 states faced off during the National Geographic state level bees.

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    Study Corner

    What's the best way for students to prepare for the Bee? Here are some tips from the National Geographic Bee.

Student Activities

Teachers can use these activities in the classroom to prepare students for the bee!

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    Exploring Diffusion

    The movement of people, goods, or ideas from one place to another is a process known as diffusion, which plays an important role in shaping the characteristics of where we live.

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