Photo: Two people seem to tempt fate in the surf during a hurricane

Two daring beachgoers brave hurricane-driven surf in North Palm Beach, Florida. Hurricanes that hit the U.S. East Coast typically form over the tropics between June and November.

Photograph by James P. Blair

Hurricanes can wreak havoc in many ways, with lashing winds, torrential rains, and inundating storm surges. Here are some tips on how to survive the fury of a hurricane.

Safety Tips

  • Coastal residents should form evacuation plans before a warning is issued to identify a safe shelter and a route to get there.
  • Stock up on emergency supplies including food, water, protective clothing, medications, batteries, flashlights, important documents, road maps, and a full tank of gasoline.
  • As a storm unfolds, evacuees should listen to local authorities on radio or television. Evacuation routes often close as a storm develops.
  • Dedicated professionals and improved technology have made hurricane forecasting more accurate than ever before—but it’s far from precise.
  • If forced to weather a storm, get inside the most secure building possible and stay away from windows.
  • Remember that a lull often signifies the storm’s eye—not its end. Anyone riding out a hurricane should wait for authorities to announce that the danger has passed.

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