Iron Maiden #39, the car entered by Granite Falls High School's ShopGirls team in Shell Eco-marathon Americas 2013

Photograph courtesy ShopGirls

School: Granite Falls High School

Team: ShopGirls

Car Name: Iron Maiden (Diesel Prototype category)

What is special about your car? The Iron Maiden is one of the safest cars in the competition. It has a steel chassis with aluminum sides and a fiberglass nose and back body. The canopy is also made from a strong type plastic called Lexan, so that it won't shatter easily on impact. The position the driver sits in is comfortable and allows the driver to easily see their surroundings. Because it was made by an all-female team, the Iron Maiden is the only car in Shell Eco-marathon to be painted bright green and pink. The Iron Maiden has also been on display many times for such things as expositions, conferences, interviews and documentaries since we were the first all-female team.

Why is fuel efficiency important to your team? Fuel efficiency is important to the ShopGirls team because we want to help make the world into a state where neither humans nor our environment is harmed by the things we do. Although there might be times and things that we do that harm our environment which we can't control, fuel efficiency is something that we can. By making the efficiency of our cars better and using less fuel, we are better able to protect our environment, ourselves, and our prosperity.

Who or what inspired you on the way to the Eco-marathon? The girls that have gone through the Eco-team program at our school inspired us on the way to the Eco-marathon this year. So many great girls have gone through the program just like us and have gone on to do great things. Numerous alumni are currently at prodigious colleges, including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Stanford. Many of us aspire to be like them, and those new on the team definitely look up to those who are older and have been in the program longer.

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